The Value of Extending Specialized Courses & Programs Across K-12 Schools

November 28, 2022
Subscribe For Weekly Resources

The past decade has seen a flowering of innovative, engaging, and multidisciplinary programmatic offerings in districts across the nation. From programs focused on specific subject areas such as science or engineering to career-driven offerings such as magnet programs or courses focused on introducing students to careers in the legal or medical fields, these offerings encourage students to explore careers of interest to them, learn through hands-on and project-based experiences, utilize professional grade equipment, and, at times, collaborate with experts within a field. 

Experiences and learning opportunities that used to be reserved for college coursework and beyond are now offered to students before they graduate from high school through these programs. Oftentimes, these options are primarily designed for secondary students. However, there is tremendous value in extending the reach of these programs across the entire K-12 population within a district. The resources, connections, and opportunities for learning and teaching can benefit younger students who are eager to learn about what might be possible in their future schooling and older students who are currently enrolled in these courses. And this work to bring cohesion and alignment across the K-12 learning can elevate the college and career readiness culture of the district as a whole. 

Systemic Benefits

Adding Purpose to Learning

All too often elementary students do not connect what they are learning in math or science or English Language Arts to their future endeavors. However, when younger students can see real-world applications of their learning and get excited about how they will use these lessons in the near-future, they see a purpose in their day-to-day lessons. If they understand that they might be able to apply their science and math to marine biology course work in middle or high school, they are likely to be more motivated in their learning. If they understand the connection between writing a persuasive essay to arguing the side of a court case in a future debate course or legal studies program, they are likely to be more engaged in the efforts. 

And, when older students take time to share what they are learning and how it connects with what they learned before and what they hope to do in the future, their goals and dreams become clearer and more focused. They are reminded of the interests and passions that drove them to choose to engage in the course work, the efforts they have put in thus far, and how these opportunities will inform future decision-making and postsecondary options. 

Deeper Learning and Developing Applicable Skills

When middle and high school students share what they are learning with students younger than them–when they, themselves, are put in a position to teach others–their understanding of the content and lessons becomes deeper and more refined. Questions from younger students force them to reflect, consider, and view their learning from different angles and perspectives. 

When students have an audience for their work, they are often more motivated to produce higher quality products and presentations. They must also develop skills such as problem-solving on the fly, thinking about how a person with a different background might understand or experience the situation, or having patience with others as they learn at a different pace. These kinds of lessons and skills are very challenging to authentically work on inside a classroom and are highly relevant and transferable to most areas of student learning and career fields. 

Engaging the Next Generation of Students & Building Demand for District Programs

When young students see older students talking about and sharing their passions, interests, and involvement in school-related programs and courses, they gain a clearer picture about options and possibilities for their future. They begin to understand how what they are learning now can set them on a path to deeper learning in areas of interest later on in their educational path. They are excited about their middle and high school options that will allow them to learn about these interesting topics and explore their passions. This is especially important with the backdrop of districts across the country grappling with ways to maintain or increase enrollment. By creating buy-in from students and families early and building enthusiasm for course or programmatic offerings, families are much more likely to be involved and eager to participate, strengthening the overall quality of and demand for the programs. 

Ways to Extend the Reach of Innovative Course and Programmatic Offerings

College and career counselors are often the experts on these career-focused programs within schools. They can be leaders in finding ways to connect secondary programs and students with elementary students to build engagement, interest, and skills across the K-12 student body. 

Develop Counselor Relationships K-12

Counselors can work to connect with other counselors across grade bands throughout the district, especially within feeder schools. They might consider setting up ongoing conversations to talk with one another about district needs and opportunities for growth, how information and resources from specific courses or programs can be shared throughout the district, and how to facilitate greater student support and connections across grade levels.

Showcase District Facilities, Programs, and Resources

Counselors can schedule events throughout the year to share district offerings and present student learning. They might create opportunities for high school or middle school students to visit elementary schools or host open houses where students offer tours to the community. Counselors can use social media to share and celebrate what students are making and doing within their courses and programs, and invite community members to support events or fundraisers tied to specific courses or programs.

Facilitate Student Learning Opportunities & Interactions

High school or middle counselors might encourage their students from particular courses or programs to volunteer in elementary schools. For example, students taking journalism courses might offer to support a special unit on informational writing with younger students. Or, students taking classes in woodworking might offer to help build sets for a play. Counselors might even consider having students host summer camps or programs themed around a particular programmatic offering such as robotics, engineering, or culinary arts to engage and teach younger students about their areas of expertise. 

The past decade has seen a flowering of innovative, engaging, and multidisciplinary programmatic offerings in districts across the nation. From programs focused on specific subject areas such as science or engineering to career-driven offerings such as magnet programs or courses focused on introducing students to careers in the legal or medical fields, these offerings encourage students to explore careers of interest to them, learn through hands-on and project-based experiences, utilize professional grade equipment, and, at times, collaborate with experts within a field. 

Experiences and learning opportunities that used to be reserved for college coursework and beyond are now offered to students before they graduate from high school through these programs. Oftentimes, these options are primarily designed for secondary students. However, there is tremendous value in extending the reach of these programs across the entire K-12 population within a district. The resources, connections, and opportunities for learning and teaching can benefit younger students who are eager to learn about what might be possible in their future schooling and older students who are currently enrolled in these courses. And this work to bring cohesion and alignment across the K-12 learning can elevate the college and career readiness culture of the district as a whole. 

Systemic Benefits

Adding Purpose to Learning

All too often elementary students do not connect what they are learning in math or science or English Language Arts to their future endeavors. However, when younger students can see real-world applications of their learning and get excited about how they will use these lessons in the near-future, they see a purpose in their day-to-day lessons. If they understand that they might be able to apply their science and math to marine biology course work in middle or high school, they are likely to be more motivated in their learning. If they understand the connection between writing a persuasive essay to arguing the side of a court case in a future debate course or legal studies program, they are likely to be more engaged in the efforts. 

And, when older students take time to share what they are learning and how it connects with what they learned before and what they hope to do in the future, their goals and dreams become clearer and more focused. They are reminded of the interests and passions that drove them to choose to engage in the course work, the efforts they have put in thus far, and how these opportunities will inform future decision-making and postsecondary options. 

Deeper Learning and Developing Applicable Skills

When middle and high school students share what they are learning with students younger than them–when they, themselves, are put in a position to teach others–their understanding of the content and lessons becomes deeper and more refined. Questions from younger students force them to reflect, consider, and view their learning from different angles and perspectives. 

When students have an audience for their work, they are often more motivated to produce higher quality products and presentations. They must also develop skills such as problem-solving on the fly, thinking about how a person with a different background might understand or experience the situation, or having patience with others as they learn at a different pace. These kinds of lessons and skills are very challenging to authentically work on inside a classroom and are highly relevant and transferable to most areas of student learning and career fields. 

Engaging the Next Generation of Students & Building Demand for District Programs

When young students see older students talking about and sharing their passions, interests, and involvement in school-related programs and courses, they gain a clearer picture about options and possibilities for their future. They begin to understand how what they are learning now can set them on a path to deeper learning in areas of interest later on in their educational path. They are excited about their middle and high school options that will allow them to learn about these interesting topics and explore their passions. This is especially important with the backdrop of districts across the country grappling with ways to maintain or increase enrollment. By creating buy-in from students and families early and building enthusiasm for course or programmatic offerings, families are much more likely to be involved and eager to participate, strengthening the overall quality of and demand for the programs. 

Ways to Extend the Reach of Innovative Course and Programmatic Offerings

College and career counselors are often the experts on these career-focused programs within schools. They can be leaders in finding ways to connect secondary programs and students with elementary students to build engagement, interest, and skills across the K-12 student body. 

Develop Counselor Relationships K-12

Counselors can work to connect with other counselors across grade bands throughout the district, especially within feeder schools. They might consider setting up ongoing conversations to talk with one another about district needs and opportunities for growth, how information and resources from specific courses or programs can be shared throughout the district, and how to facilitate greater student support and connections across grade levels.

Showcase District Facilities, Programs, and Resources

Counselors can schedule events throughout the year to share district offerings and present student learning. They might create opportunities for high school or middle school students to visit elementary schools or host open houses where students offer tours to the community. Counselors can use social media to share and celebrate what students are making and doing within their courses and programs, and invite community members to support events or fundraisers tied to specific courses or programs.

Facilitate Student Learning Opportunities & Interactions

High school or middle counselors might encourage their students from particular courses or programs to volunteer in elementary schools. For example, students taking journalism courses might offer to support a special unit on informational writing with younger students. Or, students taking classes in woodworking might offer to help build sets for a play. Counselors might even consider having students host summer camps or programs themed around a particular programmatic offering such as robotics, engineering, or culinary arts to engage and teach younger students about their areas of expertise. 

The past decade has seen a flowering of innovative, engaging, and multidisciplinary programmatic offerings in districts across the nation. From programs focused on specific subject areas such as science or engineering to career-driven offerings such as magnet programs or courses focused on introducing students to careers in the legal or medical fields, these offerings encourage students to explore careers of interest to them, learn through hands-on and project-based experiences, utilize professional grade equipment, and, at times, collaborate with experts within a field. 

Experiences and learning opportunities that used to be reserved for college coursework and beyond are now offered to students before they graduate from high school through these programs. Oftentimes, these options are primarily designed for secondary students. However, there is tremendous value in extending the reach of these programs across the entire K-12 population within a district. The resources, connections, and opportunities for learning and teaching can benefit younger students who are eager to learn about what might be possible in their future schooling and older students who are currently enrolled in these courses. And this work to bring cohesion and alignment across the K-12 learning can elevate the college and career readiness culture of the district as a whole. 

Systemic Benefits

Adding Purpose to Learning

All too often elementary students do not connect what they are learning in math or science or English Language Arts to their future endeavors. However, when younger students can see real-world applications of their learning and get excited about how they will use these lessons in the near-future, they see a purpose in their day-to-day lessons. If they understand that they might be able to apply their science and math to marine biology course work in middle or high school, they are likely to be more motivated in their learning. If they understand the connection between writing a persuasive essay to arguing the side of a court case in a future debate course or legal studies program, they are likely to be more engaged in the efforts. 

And, when older students take time to share what they are learning and how it connects with what they learned before and what they hope to do in the future, their goals and dreams become clearer and more focused. They are reminded of the interests and passions that drove them to choose to engage in the course work, the efforts they have put in thus far, and how these opportunities will inform future decision-making and postsecondary options. 

Deeper Learning and Developing Applicable Skills

When middle and high school students share what they are learning with students younger than them–when they, themselves, are put in a position to teach others–their understanding of the content and lessons becomes deeper and more refined. Questions from younger students force them to reflect, consider, and view their learning from different angles and perspectives. 

When students have an audience for their work, they are often more motivated to produce higher quality products and presentations. They must also develop skills such as problem-solving on the fly, thinking about how a person with a different background might understand or experience the situation, or having patience with others as they learn at a different pace. These kinds of lessons and skills are very challenging to authentically work on inside a classroom and are highly relevant and transferable to most areas of student learning and career fields. 

Engaging the Next Generation of Students & Building Demand for District Programs

When young students see older students talking about and sharing their passions, interests, and involvement in school-related programs and courses, they gain a clearer picture about options and possibilities for their future. They begin to understand how what they are learning now can set them on a path to deeper learning in areas of interest later on in their educational path. They are excited about their middle and high school options that will allow them to learn about these interesting topics and explore their passions. This is especially important with the backdrop of districts across the country grappling with ways to maintain or increase enrollment. By creating buy-in from students and families early and building enthusiasm for course or programmatic offerings, families are much more likely to be involved and eager to participate, strengthening the overall quality of and demand for the programs. 

Ways to Extend the Reach of Innovative Course and Programmatic Offerings

College and career counselors are often the experts on these career-focused programs within schools. They can be leaders in finding ways to connect secondary programs and students with elementary students to build engagement, interest, and skills across the K-12 student body. 

Develop Counselor Relationships K-12

Counselors can work to connect with other counselors across grade bands throughout the district, especially within feeder schools. They might consider setting up ongoing conversations to talk with one another about district needs and opportunities for growth, how information and resources from specific courses or programs can be shared throughout the district, and how to facilitate greater student support and connections across grade levels.

Showcase District Facilities, Programs, and Resources

Counselors can schedule events throughout the year to share district offerings and present student learning. They might create opportunities for high school or middle school students to visit elementary schools or host open houses where students offer tours to the community. Counselors can use social media to share and celebrate what students are making and doing within their courses and programs, and invite community members to support events or fundraisers tied to specific courses or programs.

Facilitate Student Learning Opportunities & Interactions

High school or middle counselors might encourage their students from particular courses or programs to volunteer in elementary schools. For example, students taking journalism courses might offer to support a special unit on informational writing with younger students. Or, students taking classes in woodworking might offer to help build sets for a play. Counselors might even consider having students host summer camps or programs themed around a particular programmatic offering such as robotics, engineering, or culinary arts to engage and teach younger students about their areas of expertise. 

Download Your Free eBook

Fill out the form below to access your free download following submission.

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

The past decade has seen a flowering of innovative, engaging, and multidisciplinary programmatic offerings in districts across the nation. From programs focused on specific subject areas such as science or engineering to career-driven offerings such as magnet programs or courses focused on introducing students to careers in the legal or medical fields, these offerings encourage students to explore careers of interest to them, learn through hands-on and project-based experiences, utilize professional grade equipment, and, at times, collaborate with experts within a field. 

Experiences and learning opportunities that used to be reserved for college coursework and beyond are now offered to students before they graduate from high school through these programs. Oftentimes, these options are primarily designed for secondary students. However, there is tremendous value in extending the reach of these programs across the entire K-12 population within a district. The resources, connections, and opportunities for learning and teaching can benefit younger students who are eager to learn about what might be possible in their future schooling and older students who are currently enrolled in these courses. And this work to bring cohesion and alignment across the K-12 learning can elevate the college and career readiness culture of the district as a whole. 

Systemic Benefits

Adding Purpose to Learning

All too often elementary students do not connect what they are learning in math or science or English Language Arts to their future endeavors. However, when younger students can see real-world applications of their learning and get excited about how they will use these lessons in the near-future, they see a purpose in their day-to-day lessons. If they understand that they might be able to apply their science and math to marine biology course work in middle or high school, they are likely to be more motivated in their learning. If they understand the connection between writing a persuasive essay to arguing the side of a court case in a future debate course or legal studies program, they are likely to be more engaged in the efforts. 

And, when older students take time to share what they are learning and how it connects with what they learned before and what they hope to do in the future, their goals and dreams become clearer and more focused. They are reminded of the interests and passions that drove them to choose to engage in the course work, the efforts they have put in thus far, and how these opportunities will inform future decision-making and postsecondary options. 

Deeper Learning and Developing Applicable Skills

When middle and high school students share what they are learning with students younger than them–when they, themselves, are put in a position to teach others–their understanding of the content and lessons becomes deeper and more refined. Questions from younger students force them to reflect, consider, and view their learning from different angles and perspectives. 

When students have an audience for their work, they are often more motivated to produce higher quality products and presentations. They must also develop skills such as problem-solving on the fly, thinking about how a person with a different background might understand or experience the situation, or having patience with others as they learn at a different pace. These kinds of lessons and skills are very challenging to authentically work on inside a classroom and are highly relevant and transferable to most areas of student learning and career fields. 

Engaging the Next Generation of Students & Building Demand for District Programs

When young students see older students talking about and sharing their passions, interests, and involvement in school-related programs and courses, they gain a clearer picture about options and possibilities for their future. They begin to understand how what they are learning now can set them on a path to deeper learning in areas of interest later on in their educational path. They are excited about their middle and high school options that will allow them to learn about these interesting topics and explore their passions. This is especially important with the backdrop of districts across the country grappling with ways to maintain or increase enrollment. By creating buy-in from students and families early and building enthusiasm for course or programmatic offerings, families are much more likely to be involved and eager to participate, strengthening the overall quality of and demand for the programs. 

Ways to Extend the Reach of Innovative Course and Programmatic Offerings

College and career counselors are often the experts on these career-focused programs within schools. They can be leaders in finding ways to connect secondary programs and students with elementary students to build engagement, interest, and skills across the K-12 student body. 

Develop Counselor Relationships K-12

Counselors can work to connect with other counselors across grade bands throughout the district, especially within feeder schools. They might consider setting up ongoing conversations to talk with one another about district needs and opportunities for growth, how information and resources from specific courses or programs can be shared throughout the district, and how to facilitate greater student support and connections across grade levels.

Showcase District Facilities, Programs, and Resources

Counselors can schedule events throughout the year to share district offerings and present student learning. They might create opportunities for high school or middle school students to visit elementary schools or host open houses where students offer tours to the community. Counselors can use social media to share and celebrate what students are making and doing within their courses and programs, and invite community members to support events or fundraisers tied to specific courses or programs.

Facilitate Student Learning Opportunities & Interactions

High school or middle counselors might encourage their students from particular courses or programs to volunteer in elementary schools. For example, students taking journalism courses might offer to support a special unit on informational writing with younger students. Or, students taking classes in woodworking might offer to help build sets for a play. Counselors might even consider having students host summer camps or programs themed around a particular programmatic offering such as robotics, engineering, or culinary arts to engage and teach younger students about their areas of expertise. 

Speakers
No items found.

Join the free webinar.

Fill out the form below to gain access to the free webinar.

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

The past decade has seen a flowering of innovative, engaging, and multidisciplinary programmatic offerings in districts across the nation. From programs focused on specific subject areas such as science or engineering to career-driven offerings such as magnet programs or courses focused on introducing students to careers in the legal or medical fields, these offerings encourage students to explore careers of interest to them, learn through hands-on and project-based experiences, utilize professional grade equipment, and, at times, collaborate with experts within a field. 

Experiences and learning opportunities that used to be reserved for college coursework and beyond are now offered to students before they graduate from high school through these programs. Oftentimes, these options are primarily designed for secondary students. However, there is tremendous value in extending the reach of these programs across the entire K-12 population within a district. The resources, connections, and opportunities for learning and teaching can benefit younger students who are eager to learn about what might be possible in their future schooling and older students who are currently enrolled in these courses. And this work to bring cohesion and alignment across the K-12 learning can elevate the college and career readiness culture of the district as a whole. 

Systemic Benefits

Adding Purpose to Learning

All too often elementary students do not connect what they are learning in math or science or English Language Arts to their future endeavors. However, when younger students can see real-world applications of their learning and get excited about how they will use these lessons in the near-future, they see a purpose in their day-to-day lessons. If they understand that they might be able to apply their science and math to marine biology course work in middle or high school, they are likely to be more motivated in their learning. If they understand the connection between writing a persuasive essay to arguing the side of a court case in a future debate course or legal studies program, they are likely to be more engaged in the efforts. 

And, when older students take time to share what they are learning and how it connects with what they learned before and what they hope to do in the future, their goals and dreams become clearer and more focused. They are reminded of the interests and passions that drove them to choose to engage in the course work, the efforts they have put in thus far, and how these opportunities will inform future decision-making and postsecondary options. 

Deeper Learning and Developing Applicable Skills

When middle and high school students share what they are learning with students younger than them–when they, themselves, are put in a position to teach others–their understanding of the content and lessons becomes deeper and more refined. Questions from younger students force them to reflect, consider, and view their learning from different angles and perspectives. 

When students have an audience for their work, they are often more motivated to produce higher quality products and presentations. They must also develop skills such as problem-solving on the fly, thinking about how a person with a different background might understand or experience the situation, or having patience with others as they learn at a different pace. These kinds of lessons and skills are very challenging to authentically work on inside a classroom and are highly relevant and transferable to most areas of student learning and career fields. 

Engaging the Next Generation of Students & Building Demand for District Programs

When young students see older students talking about and sharing their passions, interests, and involvement in school-related programs and courses, they gain a clearer picture about options and possibilities for their future. They begin to understand how what they are learning now can set them on a path to deeper learning in areas of interest later on in their educational path. They are excited about their middle and high school options that will allow them to learn about these interesting topics and explore their passions. This is especially important with the backdrop of districts across the country grappling with ways to maintain or increase enrollment. By creating buy-in from students and families early and building enthusiasm for course or programmatic offerings, families are much more likely to be involved and eager to participate, strengthening the overall quality of and demand for the programs. 

Ways to Extend the Reach of Innovative Course and Programmatic Offerings

College and career counselors are often the experts on these career-focused programs within schools. They can be leaders in finding ways to connect secondary programs and students with elementary students to build engagement, interest, and skills across the K-12 student body. 

Develop Counselor Relationships K-12

Counselors can work to connect with other counselors across grade bands throughout the district, especially within feeder schools. They might consider setting up ongoing conversations to talk with one another about district needs and opportunities for growth, how information and resources from specific courses or programs can be shared throughout the district, and how to facilitate greater student support and connections across grade levels.

Showcase District Facilities, Programs, and Resources

Counselors can schedule events throughout the year to share district offerings and present student learning. They might create opportunities for high school or middle school students to visit elementary schools or host open houses where students offer tours to the community. Counselors can use social media to share and celebrate what students are making and doing within their courses and programs, and invite community members to support events or fundraisers tied to specific courses or programs.

Facilitate Student Learning Opportunities & Interactions

High school or middle counselors might encourage their students from particular courses or programs to volunteer in elementary schools. For example, students taking journalism courses might offer to support a special unit on informational writing with younger students. Or, students taking classes in woodworking might offer to help build sets for a play. Counselors might even consider having students host summer camps or programs themed around a particular programmatic offering such as robotics, engineering, or culinary arts to engage and teach younger students about their areas of expertise. 

Get In Touch

By submitting this form, you agree to our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. You may receive marketing emails and can opt out any time.

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Download your 1-pager

The past decade has seen a flowering of innovative, engaging, and multidisciplinary programmatic offerings in districts across the nation. From programs focused on specific subject areas such as science or engineering to career-driven offerings such as magnet programs or courses focused on introducing students to careers in the legal or medical fields, these offerings encourage students to explore careers of interest to them, learn through hands-on and project-based experiences, utilize professional grade equipment, and, at times, collaborate with experts within a field. 

Experiences and learning opportunities that used to be reserved for college coursework and beyond are now offered to students before they graduate from high school through these programs. Oftentimes, these options are primarily designed for secondary students. However, there is tremendous value in extending the reach of these programs across the entire K-12 population within a district. The resources, connections, and opportunities for learning and teaching can benefit younger students who are eager to learn about what might be possible in their future schooling and older students who are currently enrolled in these courses. And this work to bring cohesion and alignment across the K-12 learning can elevate the college and career readiness culture of the district as a whole. 

Systemic Benefits

Adding Purpose to Learning

All too often elementary students do not connect what they are learning in math or science or English Language Arts to their future endeavors. However, when younger students can see real-world applications of their learning and get excited about how they will use these lessons in the near-future, they see a purpose in their day-to-day lessons. If they understand that they might be able to apply their science and math to marine biology course work in middle or high school, they are likely to be more motivated in their learning. If they understand the connection between writing a persuasive essay to arguing the side of a court case in a future debate course or legal studies program, they are likely to be more engaged in the efforts. 

And, when older students take time to share what they are learning and how it connects with what they learned before and what they hope to do in the future, their goals and dreams become clearer and more focused. They are reminded of the interests and passions that drove them to choose to engage in the course work, the efforts they have put in thus far, and how these opportunities will inform future decision-making and postsecondary options. 

Deeper Learning and Developing Applicable Skills

When middle and high school students share what they are learning with students younger than them–when they, themselves, are put in a position to teach others–their understanding of the content and lessons becomes deeper and more refined. Questions from younger students force them to reflect, consider, and view their learning from different angles and perspectives. 

When students have an audience for their work, they are often more motivated to produce higher quality products and presentations. They must also develop skills such as problem-solving on the fly, thinking about how a person with a different background might understand or experience the situation, or having patience with others as they learn at a different pace. These kinds of lessons and skills are very challenging to authentically work on inside a classroom and are highly relevant and transferable to most areas of student learning and career fields. 

Engaging the Next Generation of Students & Building Demand for District Programs

When young students see older students talking about and sharing their passions, interests, and involvement in school-related programs and courses, they gain a clearer picture about options and possibilities for their future. They begin to understand how what they are learning now can set them on a path to deeper learning in areas of interest later on in their educational path. They are excited about their middle and high school options that will allow them to learn about these interesting topics and explore their passions. This is especially important with the backdrop of districts across the country grappling with ways to maintain or increase enrollment. By creating buy-in from students and families early and building enthusiasm for course or programmatic offerings, families are much more likely to be involved and eager to participate, strengthening the overall quality of and demand for the programs. 

Ways to Extend the Reach of Innovative Course and Programmatic Offerings

College and career counselors are often the experts on these career-focused programs within schools. They can be leaders in finding ways to connect secondary programs and students with elementary students to build engagement, interest, and skills across the K-12 student body. 

Develop Counselor Relationships K-12

Counselors can work to connect with other counselors across grade bands throughout the district, especially within feeder schools. They might consider setting up ongoing conversations to talk with one another about district needs and opportunities for growth, how information and resources from specific courses or programs can be shared throughout the district, and how to facilitate greater student support and connections across grade levels.

Showcase District Facilities, Programs, and Resources

Counselors can schedule events throughout the year to share district offerings and present student learning. They might create opportunities for high school or middle school students to visit elementary schools or host open houses where students offer tours to the community. Counselors can use social media to share and celebrate what students are making and doing within their courses and programs, and invite community members to support events or fundraisers tied to specific courses or programs.

Facilitate Student Learning Opportunities & Interactions

High school or middle counselors might encourage their students from particular courses or programs to volunteer in elementary schools. For example, students taking journalism courses might offer to support a special unit on informational writing with younger students. Or, students taking classes in woodworking might offer to help build sets for a play. Counselors might even consider having students host summer camps or programs themed around a particular programmatic offering such as robotics, engineering, or culinary arts to engage and teach younger students about their areas of expertise.