How College And Career Readiness Can Become Imbedded In The Fabric Of Your Community

October 2, 2023

One of the best ways to expand and deepen College and Career Readiness (CCR) efforts is to communicate their value to both current students and to those outside of the school community. By highlighting the benefits of a dynamic and meaningful CCR program, there is potential for future connections, new opportunities, and growth to new industries. This excitement can come from younger students eager to participate in CCR offerings, businesses looking to partner, and community members invested in the success of the district’s CCR programs.  

For most adults, a high school’s CCR programing looks far different than what was available during their secondary years. An influx of federal and state funding targeted toward career readiness has given school districts the capacity to grow and expand training opportunities for students. With this in mind, simple ways to share and showcase what is happening within various CCR programs and organizations can go a long way in developing a shared understanding of all that exists and all that is possible.

For CCR programs in most districts, an approach that takes tight knit community dynamics into play will lead to greater overall engagement and success. Deep connections among people, businesses, and civic organizations are a hallmark of these communities. Because of this, the communities that surround smaller schools and districts are typically eager to support, honor, and celebrate their students. Building upon existing relationships to foster opportunities and support for students can bolster the overall CCR offerings and impact for a school community. 

Promoting Student Experiences

Most communities have numerous ways they show support for student athletes. Taking cues from these celebrations can provide a framework for thinking about how to showcase students participating in meaningful CCR programs and work-based learning (WBL) opportunities 

  • Create and display posters spotlighting students participating in internship programs or other work-based learning opportunities.
  • Host open houses or set up displays of CCR materials at school events such as athletic games or musical performances. Consider sharing student creations from CCR courses, short stories about student WBL involvement, or pictures from various events, classes, or programs.
  • Honor alumni from WBL programs, and spotlight their stories with details about their high school CCR courses, college studies, current career, and future goals. 

Highlighting Business Partnerships

In smaller communities, businesses and civic organizations are often tightly connected to the local high school. From business owners or members having attended the school themselves to having their children attend to employing students as part-time workers or providing scholarships, these businesses and organizations are key partners for a school’s CCR efforts. It is critical to not take these relationships for granted and to find ways to promote and celebrate the collaboration. This can be done very simply and yield huge returns on investment for the time and support given. 

  • Hang banners of local partners and sponsors on school fences to share thanks and spotlight contributions. In addition to advertising for the business or organization, it also serves as a visual representation of the school community’s industry partnerships. 
  • Spotlight the contributions or WBL opportunities provided by a local business or organization on school websites and newsletters. When talking about internships or apprenticeships, specifically highlight the skills students developed. 
  • Share gratitude and celebrations on social media accounts to highlight the partnerships. Use these opportunities to remind others that the school is always looking to expand partnerships and opportunities for students. 

Connecting to the Broader Community 

In order to grow a CCR program, it is important for a school to spark interest, expand reach, and foster engagement. Finding ways to tell the community about what is available and the benefits of CCR programming can increase awareness for current students and plant seeds of excitement for the future. 

  • Invite elementary and middle school students to tour CCR facilities with high school participants as their tour guides. 
  • Encourage high school students to attend relevant community meetings to talk about what they are learning and share achievements. 
  • Find ways for students in career-related skill development programs to contribute to the community by utilizing the skills they are learning. For instance, you may have students in a culinary program cater a city event. Or, you may have students in a fashion design program help make costumes for an elementary or middle school play. 
  • Have students be present at community events. Host a booth at a town expo, lead an activity at a local festival, or march in a parade. Just providing exposure to programs and building connections to the broader community can inspire enthusiasm and participation.  

CCR Can Become Part of the Fabric of the Community 

In smaller towns and districts, community traditions form much more quickly as many more families remain local over generations. By embedding these CCR celebrations and overall engagement into the broader community, they transition from serving the purpose of educating others on the opportunities that exist to becoming part of the community’s way of doing things. People begin to look forward to seeing participation from these groups and programs at events. They look for updates on what clubs are doing or where graduates from the high school will continue their studies. And, as students go from participating in work-based learning opportunities in high school to eventually opening their own businesses within the community or being civic organization leaders, the tangible benefits of CCR programs are obvious. These programs naturally become part of the town's evolution and culture. 

One of the best ways to expand and deepen College and Career Readiness (CCR) efforts is to communicate their value to both current students and to those outside of the school community. By highlighting the benefits of a dynamic and meaningful CCR program, there is potential for future connections, new opportunities, and growth to new industries. This excitement can come from younger students eager to participate in CCR offerings, businesses looking to partner, and community members invested in the success of the district’s CCR programs.  

For most adults, a high school’s CCR programing looks far different than what was available during their secondary years. An influx of federal and state funding targeted toward career readiness has given school districts the capacity to grow and expand training opportunities for students. With this in mind, simple ways to share and showcase what is happening within various CCR programs and organizations can go a long way in developing a shared understanding of all that exists and all that is possible.

For CCR programs in most districts, an approach that takes tight knit community dynamics into play will lead to greater overall engagement and success. Deep connections among people, businesses, and civic organizations are a hallmark of these communities. Because of this, the communities that surround smaller schools and districts are typically eager to support, honor, and celebrate their students. Building upon existing relationships to foster opportunities and support for students can bolster the overall CCR offerings and impact for a school community. 

Promoting Student Experiences

Most communities have numerous ways they show support for student athletes. Taking cues from these celebrations can provide a framework for thinking about how to showcase students participating in meaningful CCR programs and work-based learning (WBL) opportunities 

  • Create and display posters spotlighting students participating in internship programs or other work-based learning opportunities.
  • Host open houses or set up displays of CCR materials at school events such as athletic games or musical performances. Consider sharing student creations from CCR courses, short stories about student WBL involvement, or pictures from various events, classes, or programs.
  • Honor alumni from WBL programs, and spotlight their stories with details about their high school CCR courses, college studies, current career, and future goals. 

Highlighting Business Partnerships

In smaller communities, businesses and civic organizations are often tightly connected to the local high school. From business owners or members having attended the school themselves to having their children attend to employing students as part-time workers or providing scholarships, these businesses and organizations are key partners for a school’s CCR efforts. It is critical to not take these relationships for granted and to find ways to promote and celebrate the collaboration. This can be done very simply and yield huge returns on investment for the time and support given. 

  • Hang banners of local partners and sponsors on school fences to share thanks and spotlight contributions. In addition to advertising for the business or organization, it also serves as a visual representation of the school community’s industry partnerships. 
  • Spotlight the contributions or WBL opportunities provided by a local business or organization on school websites and newsletters. When talking about internships or apprenticeships, specifically highlight the skills students developed. 
  • Share gratitude and celebrations on social media accounts to highlight the partnerships. Use these opportunities to remind others that the school is always looking to expand partnerships and opportunities for students. 

Connecting to the Broader Community 

In order to grow a CCR program, it is important for a school to spark interest, expand reach, and foster engagement. Finding ways to tell the community about what is available and the benefits of CCR programming can increase awareness for current students and plant seeds of excitement for the future. 

  • Invite elementary and middle school students to tour CCR facilities with high school participants as their tour guides. 
  • Encourage high school students to attend relevant community meetings to talk about what they are learning and share achievements. 
  • Find ways for students in career-related skill development programs to contribute to the community by utilizing the skills they are learning. For instance, you may have students in a culinary program cater a city event. Or, you may have students in a fashion design program help make costumes for an elementary or middle school play. 
  • Have students be present at community events. Host a booth at a town expo, lead an activity at a local festival, or march in a parade. Just providing exposure to programs and building connections to the broader community can inspire enthusiasm and participation.  

CCR Can Become Part of the Fabric of the Community 

In smaller towns and districts, community traditions form much more quickly as many more families remain local over generations. By embedding these CCR celebrations and overall engagement into the broader community, they transition from serving the purpose of educating others on the opportunities that exist to becoming part of the community’s way of doing things. People begin to look forward to seeing participation from these groups and programs at events. They look for updates on what clubs are doing or where graduates from the high school will continue their studies. And, as students go from participating in work-based learning opportunities in high school to eventually opening their own businesses within the community or being civic organization leaders, the tangible benefits of CCR programs are obvious. These programs naturally become part of the town's evolution and culture. 

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One of the best ways to expand and deepen College and Career Readiness (CCR) efforts is to communicate their value to both current students and to those outside of the school community. By highlighting the benefits of a dynamic and meaningful CCR program, there is potential for future connections, new opportunities, and growth to new industries. This excitement can come from younger students eager to participate in CCR offerings, businesses looking to partner, and community members invested in the success of the district’s CCR programs.  

For most adults, a high school’s CCR programing looks far different than what was available during their secondary years. An influx of federal and state funding targeted toward career readiness has given school districts the capacity to grow and expand training opportunities for students. With this in mind, simple ways to share and showcase what is happening within various CCR programs and organizations can go a long way in developing a shared understanding of all that exists and all that is possible.

For CCR programs in most districts, an approach that takes tight knit community dynamics into play will lead to greater overall engagement and success. Deep connections among people, businesses, and civic organizations are a hallmark of these communities. Because of this, the communities that surround smaller schools and districts are typically eager to support, honor, and celebrate their students. Building upon existing relationships to foster opportunities and support for students can bolster the overall CCR offerings and impact for a school community. 

Promoting Student Experiences

Most communities have numerous ways they show support for student athletes. Taking cues from these celebrations can provide a framework for thinking about how to showcase students participating in meaningful CCR programs and work-based learning (WBL) opportunities 

  • Create and display posters spotlighting students participating in internship programs or other work-based learning opportunities.
  • Host open houses or set up displays of CCR materials at school events such as athletic games or musical performances. Consider sharing student creations from CCR courses, short stories about student WBL involvement, or pictures from various events, classes, or programs.
  • Honor alumni from WBL programs, and spotlight their stories with details about their high school CCR courses, college studies, current career, and future goals. 

Highlighting Business Partnerships

In smaller communities, businesses and civic organizations are often tightly connected to the local high school. From business owners or members having attended the school themselves to having their children attend to employing students as part-time workers or providing scholarships, these businesses and organizations are key partners for a school’s CCR efforts. It is critical to not take these relationships for granted and to find ways to promote and celebrate the collaboration. This can be done very simply and yield huge returns on investment for the time and support given. 

  • Hang banners of local partners and sponsors on school fences to share thanks and spotlight contributions. In addition to advertising for the business or organization, it also serves as a visual representation of the school community’s industry partnerships. 
  • Spotlight the contributions or WBL opportunities provided by a local business or organization on school websites and newsletters. When talking about internships or apprenticeships, specifically highlight the skills students developed. 
  • Share gratitude and celebrations on social media accounts to highlight the partnerships. Use these opportunities to remind others that the school is always looking to expand partnerships and opportunities for students. 

Connecting to the Broader Community 

In order to grow a CCR program, it is important for a school to spark interest, expand reach, and foster engagement. Finding ways to tell the community about what is available and the benefits of CCR programming can increase awareness for current students and plant seeds of excitement for the future. 

  • Invite elementary and middle school students to tour CCR facilities with high school participants as their tour guides. 
  • Encourage high school students to attend relevant community meetings to talk about what they are learning and share achievements. 
  • Find ways for students in career-related skill development programs to contribute to the community by utilizing the skills they are learning. For instance, you may have students in a culinary program cater a city event. Or, you may have students in a fashion design program help make costumes for an elementary or middle school play. 
  • Have students be present at community events. Host a booth at a town expo, lead an activity at a local festival, or march in a parade. Just providing exposure to programs and building connections to the broader community can inspire enthusiasm and participation.  

CCR Can Become Part of the Fabric of the Community 

In smaller towns and districts, community traditions form much more quickly as many more families remain local over generations. By embedding these CCR celebrations and overall engagement into the broader community, they transition from serving the purpose of educating others on the opportunities that exist to becoming part of the community’s way of doing things. People begin to look forward to seeing participation from these groups and programs at events. They look for updates on what clubs are doing or where graduates from the high school will continue their studies. And, as students go from participating in work-based learning opportunities in high school to eventually opening their own businesses within the community or being civic organization leaders, the tangible benefits of CCR programs are obvious. These programs naturally become part of the town's evolution and culture. 

One of the best ways to expand and deepen College and Career Readiness (CCR) efforts is to communicate their value to both current students and to those outside of the school community. By highlighting the benefits of a dynamic and meaningful CCR program, there is potential for future connections, new opportunities, and growth to new industries. This excitement can come from younger students eager to participate in CCR offerings, businesses looking to partner, and community members invested in the success of the district’s CCR programs.  

For most adults, a high school’s CCR programing looks far different than what was available during their secondary years. An influx of federal and state funding targeted toward career readiness has given school districts the capacity to grow and expand training opportunities for students. With this in mind, simple ways to share and showcase what is happening within various CCR programs and organizations can go a long way in developing a shared understanding of all that exists and all that is possible.

For CCR programs in most districts, an approach that takes tight knit community dynamics into play will lead to greater overall engagement and success. Deep connections among people, businesses, and civic organizations are a hallmark of these communities. Because of this, the communities that surround smaller schools and districts are typically eager to support, honor, and celebrate their students. Building upon existing relationships to foster opportunities and support for students can bolster the overall CCR offerings and impact for a school community. 

Promoting Student Experiences

Most communities have numerous ways they show support for student athletes. Taking cues from these celebrations can provide a framework for thinking about how to showcase students participating in meaningful CCR programs and work-based learning (WBL) opportunities 

  • Create and display posters spotlighting students participating in internship programs or other work-based learning opportunities.
  • Host open houses or set up displays of CCR materials at school events such as athletic games or musical performances. Consider sharing student creations from CCR courses, short stories about student WBL involvement, or pictures from various events, classes, or programs.
  • Honor alumni from WBL programs, and spotlight their stories with details about their high school CCR courses, college studies, current career, and future goals. 

Highlighting Business Partnerships

In smaller communities, businesses and civic organizations are often tightly connected to the local high school. From business owners or members having attended the school themselves to having their children attend to employing students as part-time workers or providing scholarships, these businesses and organizations are key partners for a school’s CCR efforts. It is critical to not take these relationships for granted and to find ways to promote and celebrate the collaboration. This can be done very simply and yield huge returns on investment for the time and support given. 

  • Hang banners of local partners and sponsors on school fences to share thanks and spotlight contributions. In addition to advertising for the business or organization, it also serves as a visual representation of the school community’s industry partnerships. 
  • Spotlight the contributions or WBL opportunities provided by a local business or organization on school websites and newsletters. When talking about internships or apprenticeships, specifically highlight the skills students developed. 
  • Share gratitude and celebrations on social media accounts to highlight the partnerships. Use these opportunities to remind others that the school is always looking to expand partnerships and opportunities for students. 

Connecting to the Broader Community 

In order to grow a CCR program, it is important for a school to spark interest, expand reach, and foster engagement. Finding ways to tell the community about what is available and the benefits of CCR programming can increase awareness for current students and plant seeds of excitement for the future. 

  • Invite elementary and middle school students to tour CCR facilities with high school participants as their tour guides. 
  • Encourage high school students to attend relevant community meetings to talk about what they are learning and share achievements. 
  • Find ways for students in career-related skill development programs to contribute to the community by utilizing the skills they are learning. For instance, you may have students in a culinary program cater a city event. Or, you may have students in a fashion design program help make costumes for an elementary or middle school play. 
  • Have students be present at community events. Host a booth at a town expo, lead an activity at a local festival, or march in a parade. Just providing exposure to programs and building connections to the broader community can inspire enthusiasm and participation.  

CCR Can Become Part of the Fabric of the Community 

In smaller towns and districts, community traditions form much more quickly as many more families remain local over generations. By embedding these CCR celebrations and overall engagement into the broader community, they transition from serving the purpose of educating others on the opportunities that exist to becoming part of the community’s way of doing things. People begin to look forward to seeing participation from these groups and programs at events. They look for updates on what clubs are doing or where graduates from the high school will continue their studies. And, as students go from participating in work-based learning opportunities in high school to eventually opening their own businesses within the community or being civic organization leaders, the tangible benefits of CCR programs are obvious. These programs naturally become part of the town's evolution and culture. 

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One of the best ways to expand and deepen College and Career Readiness (CCR) efforts is to communicate their value to both current students and to those outside of the school community. By highlighting the benefits of a dynamic and meaningful CCR program, there is potential for future connections, new opportunities, and growth to new industries. This excitement can come from younger students eager to participate in CCR offerings, businesses looking to partner, and community members invested in the success of the district’s CCR programs.  

For most adults, a high school’s CCR programing looks far different than what was available during their secondary years. An influx of federal and state funding targeted toward career readiness has given school districts the capacity to grow and expand training opportunities for students. With this in mind, simple ways to share and showcase what is happening within various CCR programs and organizations can go a long way in developing a shared understanding of all that exists and all that is possible.

For CCR programs in most districts, an approach that takes tight knit community dynamics into play will lead to greater overall engagement and success. Deep connections among people, businesses, and civic organizations are a hallmark of these communities. Because of this, the communities that surround smaller schools and districts are typically eager to support, honor, and celebrate their students. Building upon existing relationships to foster opportunities and support for students can bolster the overall CCR offerings and impact for a school community. 

Promoting Student Experiences

Most communities have numerous ways they show support for student athletes. Taking cues from these celebrations can provide a framework for thinking about how to showcase students participating in meaningful CCR programs and work-based learning (WBL) opportunities 

  • Create and display posters spotlighting students participating in internship programs or other work-based learning opportunities.
  • Host open houses or set up displays of CCR materials at school events such as athletic games or musical performances. Consider sharing student creations from CCR courses, short stories about student WBL involvement, or pictures from various events, classes, or programs.
  • Honor alumni from WBL programs, and spotlight their stories with details about their high school CCR courses, college studies, current career, and future goals. 

Highlighting Business Partnerships

In smaller communities, businesses and civic organizations are often tightly connected to the local high school. From business owners or members having attended the school themselves to having their children attend to employing students as part-time workers or providing scholarships, these businesses and organizations are key partners for a school’s CCR efforts. It is critical to not take these relationships for granted and to find ways to promote and celebrate the collaboration. This can be done very simply and yield huge returns on investment for the time and support given. 

  • Hang banners of local partners and sponsors on school fences to share thanks and spotlight contributions. In addition to advertising for the business or organization, it also serves as a visual representation of the school community’s industry partnerships. 
  • Spotlight the contributions or WBL opportunities provided by a local business or organization on school websites and newsletters. When talking about internships or apprenticeships, specifically highlight the skills students developed. 
  • Share gratitude and celebrations on social media accounts to highlight the partnerships. Use these opportunities to remind others that the school is always looking to expand partnerships and opportunities for students. 

Connecting to the Broader Community 

In order to grow a CCR program, it is important for a school to spark interest, expand reach, and foster engagement. Finding ways to tell the community about what is available and the benefits of CCR programming can increase awareness for current students and plant seeds of excitement for the future. 

  • Invite elementary and middle school students to tour CCR facilities with high school participants as their tour guides. 
  • Encourage high school students to attend relevant community meetings to talk about what they are learning and share achievements. 
  • Find ways for students in career-related skill development programs to contribute to the community by utilizing the skills they are learning. For instance, you may have students in a culinary program cater a city event. Or, you may have students in a fashion design program help make costumes for an elementary or middle school play. 
  • Have students be present at community events. Host a booth at a town expo, lead an activity at a local festival, or march in a parade. Just providing exposure to programs and building connections to the broader community can inspire enthusiasm and participation.  

CCR Can Become Part of the Fabric of the Community 

In smaller towns and districts, community traditions form much more quickly as many more families remain local over generations. By embedding these CCR celebrations and overall engagement into the broader community, they transition from serving the purpose of educating others on the opportunities that exist to becoming part of the community’s way of doing things. People begin to look forward to seeing participation from these groups and programs at events. They look for updates on what clubs are doing or where graduates from the high school will continue their studies. And, as students go from participating in work-based learning opportunities in high school to eventually opening their own businesses within the community or being civic organization leaders, the tangible benefits of CCR programs are obvious. These programs naturally become part of the town's evolution and culture. 

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One of the best ways to expand and deepen College and Career Readiness (CCR) efforts is to communicate their value to both current students and to those outside of the school community. By highlighting the benefits of a dynamic and meaningful CCR program, there is potential for future connections, new opportunities, and growth to new industries. This excitement can come from younger students eager to participate in CCR offerings, businesses looking to partner, and community members invested in the success of the district’s CCR programs.  

For most adults, a high school’s CCR programing looks far different than what was available during their secondary years. An influx of federal and state funding targeted toward career readiness has given school districts the capacity to grow and expand training opportunities for students. With this in mind, simple ways to share and showcase what is happening within various CCR programs and organizations can go a long way in developing a shared understanding of all that exists and all that is possible.

For CCR programs in most districts, an approach that takes tight knit community dynamics into play will lead to greater overall engagement and success. Deep connections among people, businesses, and civic organizations are a hallmark of these communities. Because of this, the communities that surround smaller schools and districts are typically eager to support, honor, and celebrate their students. Building upon existing relationships to foster opportunities and support for students can bolster the overall CCR offerings and impact for a school community. 

Promoting Student Experiences

Most communities have numerous ways they show support for student athletes. Taking cues from these celebrations can provide a framework for thinking about how to showcase students participating in meaningful CCR programs and work-based learning (WBL) opportunities 

  • Create and display posters spotlighting students participating in internship programs or other work-based learning opportunities.
  • Host open houses or set up displays of CCR materials at school events such as athletic games or musical performances. Consider sharing student creations from CCR courses, short stories about student WBL involvement, or pictures from various events, classes, or programs.
  • Honor alumni from WBL programs, and spotlight their stories with details about their high school CCR courses, college studies, current career, and future goals. 

Highlighting Business Partnerships

In smaller communities, businesses and civic organizations are often tightly connected to the local high school. From business owners or members having attended the school themselves to having their children attend to employing students as part-time workers or providing scholarships, these businesses and organizations are key partners for a school’s CCR efforts. It is critical to not take these relationships for granted and to find ways to promote and celebrate the collaboration. This can be done very simply and yield huge returns on investment for the time and support given. 

  • Hang banners of local partners and sponsors on school fences to share thanks and spotlight contributions. In addition to advertising for the business or organization, it also serves as a visual representation of the school community’s industry partnerships. 
  • Spotlight the contributions or WBL opportunities provided by a local business or organization on school websites and newsletters. When talking about internships or apprenticeships, specifically highlight the skills students developed. 
  • Share gratitude and celebrations on social media accounts to highlight the partnerships. Use these opportunities to remind others that the school is always looking to expand partnerships and opportunities for students. 

Connecting to the Broader Community 

In order to grow a CCR program, it is important for a school to spark interest, expand reach, and foster engagement. Finding ways to tell the community about what is available and the benefits of CCR programming can increase awareness for current students and plant seeds of excitement for the future. 

  • Invite elementary and middle school students to tour CCR facilities with high school participants as their tour guides. 
  • Encourage high school students to attend relevant community meetings to talk about what they are learning and share achievements. 
  • Find ways for students in career-related skill development programs to contribute to the community by utilizing the skills they are learning. For instance, you may have students in a culinary program cater a city event. Or, you may have students in a fashion design program help make costumes for an elementary or middle school play. 
  • Have students be present at community events. Host a booth at a town expo, lead an activity at a local festival, or march in a parade. Just providing exposure to programs and building connections to the broader community can inspire enthusiasm and participation.  

CCR Can Become Part of the Fabric of the Community 

In smaller towns and districts, community traditions form much more quickly as many more families remain local over generations. By embedding these CCR celebrations and overall engagement into the broader community, they transition from serving the purpose of educating others on the opportunities that exist to becoming part of the community’s way of doing things. People begin to look forward to seeing participation from these groups and programs at events. They look for updates on what clubs are doing or where graduates from the high school will continue their studies. And, as students go from participating in work-based learning opportunities in high school to eventually opening their own businesses within the community or being civic organization leaders, the tangible benefits of CCR programs are obvious. These programs naturally become part of the town's evolution and culture. 

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One of the best ways to expand and deepen College and Career Readiness (CCR) efforts is to communicate their value to both current students and to those outside of the school community. By highlighting the benefits of a dynamic and meaningful CCR program, there is potential for future connections, new opportunities, and growth to new industries. This excitement can come from younger students eager to participate in CCR offerings, businesses looking to partner, and community members invested in the success of the district’s CCR programs.  

For most adults, a high school’s CCR programing looks far different than what was available during their secondary years. An influx of federal and state funding targeted toward career readiness has given school districts the capacity to grow and expand training opportunities for students. With this in mind, simple ways to share and showcase what is happening within various CCR programs and organizations can go a long way in developing a shared understanding of all that exists and all that is possible.

For CCR programs in most districts, an approach that takes tight knit community dynamics into play will lead to greater overall engagement and success. Deep connections among people, businesses, and civic organizations are a hallmark of these communities. Because of this, the communities that surround smaller schools and districts are typically eager to support, honor, and celebrate their students. Building upon existing relationships to foster opportunities and support for students can bolster the overall CCR offerings and impact for a school community. 

Promoting Student Experiences

Most communities have numerous ways they show support for student athletes. Taking cues from these celebrations can provide a framework for thinking about how to showcase students participating in meaningful CCR programs and work-based learning (WBL) opportunities 

  • Create and display posters spotlighting students participating in internship programs or other work-based learning opportunities.
  • Host open houses or set up displays of CCR materials at school events such as athletic games or musical performances. Consider sharing student creations from CCR courses, short stories about student WBL involvement, or pictures from various events, classes, or programs.
  • Honor alumni from WBL programs, and spotlight their stories with details about their high school CCR courses, college studies, current career, and future goals. 

Highlighting Business Partnerships

In smaller communities, businesses and civic organizations are often tightly connected to the local high school. From business owners or members having attended the school themselves to having their children attend to employing students as part-time workers or providing scholarships, these businesses and organizations are key partners for a school’s CCR efforts. It is critical to not take these relationships for granted and to find ways to promote and celebrate the collaboration. This can be done very simply and yield huge returns on investment for the time and support given. 

  • Hang banners of local partners and sponsors on school fences to share thanks and spotlight contributions. In addition to advertising for the business or organization, it also serves as a visual representation of the school community’s industry partnerships. 
  • Spotlight the contributions or WBL opportunities provided by a local business or organization on school websites and newsletters. When talking about internships or apprenticeships, specifically highlight the skills students developed. 
  • Share gratitude and celebrations on social media accounts to highlight the partnerships. Use these opportunities to remind others that the school is always looking to expand partnerships and opportunities for students. 

Connecting to the Broader Community 

In order to grow a CCR program, it is important for a school to spark interest, expand reach, and foster engagement. Finding ways to tell the community about what is available and the benefits of CCR programming can increase awareness for current students and plant seeds of excitement for the future. 

  • Invite elementary and middle school students to tour CCR facilities with high school participants as their tour guides. 
  • Encourage high school students to attend relevant community meetings to talk about what they are learning and share achievements. 
  • Find ways for students in career-related skill development programs to contribute to the community by utilizing the skills they are learning. For instance, you may have students in a culinary program cater a city event. Or, you may have students in a fashion design program help make costumes for an elementary or middle school play. 
  • Have students be present at community events. Host a booth at a town expo, lead an activity at a local festival, or march in a parade. Just providing exposure to programs and building connections to the broader community can inspire enthusiasm and participation.  

CCR Can Become Part of the Fabric of the Community 

In smaller towns and districts, community traditions form much more quickly as many more families remain local over generations. By embedding these CCR celebrations and overall engagement into the broader community, they transition from serving the purpose of educating others on the opportunities that exist to becoming part of the community’s way of doing things. People begin to look forward to seeing participation from these groups and programs at events. They look for updates on what clubs are doing or where graduates from the high school will continue their studies. And, as students go from participating in work-based learning opportunities in high school to eventually opening their own businesses within the community or being civic organization leaders, the tangible benefits of CCR programs are obvious. These programs naturally become part of the town's evolution and culture.