CTE Month: Ways To Spotlight Career and Technical Education Programs 

February 12, 2024
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Career and Technical Education (CTE) plays a critical role in the college and career readiness (CCR) efforts of schools and districts. CTE programs build connections between academic coursework and real-world application. They create opportunities for hands-on learning and provide some of the most meaningful elements of career exploration for secondary students. For many students, CTE courses and programs create experiences for them to try out different work styles and dynamics and build skills that they can put into use immediately after graduation. 

During the month of February, we celebrate CTE month as a reminder to highlight the incredible learning and efforts that these programs include. During this month, it is important to honor the work of CTE educators and the critical role these programs play in students’ lives and in our communities. 

Celebrate CTE Successes

Counselors and CTE educators can and should use this month to showcase CTE programming, acknowledging the unique value that these programs add for individual students, as well as the broader learning community. Use the tips below to expand awareness and help to educate others about the incredible skill development that happens in CTE programs. 

  • Use Social Media: Share social media posts about specific student experiences, highlighting the program area, participating business or organization, and the skills being developed by the student. Share pictures or quotes from students that illustrate what they are learning from their experience and note which coursework or pathway helped to prepare the student for the experience. You might also share students’ postsecondary plans and how those connect to their CTE work. 
  • Hold Demonstrations & Display Work: Invite community members and students to a CTE event where students can show off the skills they are developing as well as the tools, resources, and facilities available for them to learn and practice. Being able to see the diversity of programs and internships available–from auto mechanics to woodworking to marketing to finance to design to culinary arts–helps other students to better understand how they might be able to participate in CTE in the future.
  • Advertise Industry Certifications, Apprenticeships, and Internships: Share the number of students earning industry certifications or participating in ongoing apprenticeships and internships as a way to communicate the reach of CTE programs in providing students with opportunities to earn meaningful–and employable–skills and experience. Districts can note these metrics at school board meetings and schools can share them alongside other indicators of success like graduation and college acceptance rates. 
  • Connect with Graduates: Reach out to students who participated in CTE and are now settled into apprenticeships or careers to share updates and celebrations. Helping students and families to connect current CTE work to long-term success can help motivate current students. 
  • Let Students Take the Lead on Showcasing CTE Work: Invite students, especially those interested in marketing, to take the lead in researching, writing, and sharing about CTE programs. The student voice is often able to better reach current students–with a perspective more aligned to their current experiences and ideas for communication channels that will best target the intended audience.

Use this Month to Form New Partnerships and Expand Participation

Many CTE programs are strengthened by community and industry partnerships as they provide real-world applications for the CTE learning happening in schools. As educators spotlight and celebrate the success and growth of CTE programs, they can use social media posts and other forms of publicity to reach out to and invite new collaborations. Showing tangible applications to the work-based learning (WBL) partnerships provides other businesses and community partners clear ideas about what those relationships can look like and how they can benefit all involved.

And, showcasing the enthusiasm from students and actual certifications or skills gained can spark interest from younger students considering CTE programs and pathways during high school. CTE educators and administrators might include open house events or information sessions during this month to inspire others to learn more and consider how these programs might align with their CCR goals. This cycle of interest, enthusiasm, and mentoring maintains a vibrancy and energy around CTE programs that helps to sustain their purpose and success. 

The Importance of CTE for All Students

CTE programs have the potential to benefit all students–those on a college pathway, those heading to a career after high school, and those who are uncertain about what they want their postsecondary next step to be. By offering real-world learning applications, allowing students to explore different career fields, or simply getting a taste of different work environments, CTE coursework and experiences can deepen and broaden a student’s college and career readiness. Too often, however, CTE programs are not seen as relevant for all types of pathways. Schools and districts can use this month as a springboard for advertising CTE learning opportunities and experiences to all students, regardless of postsecondary goals. They can help to move conversations around CTE programming to be viewed as a central component of and a critical way to elevate a school or district’s CCR culture. 

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Career and Technical Education (CTE) plays a critical role in the college and career readiness (CCR) efforts of schools and districts. CTE programs build connections between academic coursework and real-world application. They create opportunities for hands-on learning and provide some of the most meaningful elements of career exploration for secondary students. For many students, CTE courses and programs create experiences for them to try out different work styles and dynamics and build skills that they can put into use immediately after graduation. 

During the month of February, we celebrate CTE month as a reminder to highlight the incredible learning and efforts that these programs include. During this month, it is important to honor the work of CTE educators and the critical role these programs play in students’ lives and in our communities. 

Celebrate CTE Successes

Counselors and CTE educators can and should use this month to showcase CTE programming, acknowledging the unique value that these programs add for individual students, as well as the broader learning community. Use the tips below to expand awareness and help to educate others about the incredible skill development that happens in CTE programs. 

  • Use Social Media: Share social media posts about specific student experiences, highlighting the program area, participating business or organization, and the skills being developed by the student. Share pictures or quotes from students that illustrate what they are learning from their experience and note which coursework or pathway helped to prepare the student for the experience. You might also share students’ postsecondary plans and how those connect to their CTE work. 
  • Hold Demonstrations & Display Work: Invite community members and students to a CTE event where students can show off the skills they are developing as well as the tools, resources, and facilities available for them to learn and practice. Being able to see the diversity of programs and internships available–from auto mechanics to woodworking to marketing to finance to design to culinary arts–helps other students to better understand how they might be able to participate in CTE in the future.
  • Advertise Industry Certifications, Apprenticeships, and Internships: Share the number of students earning industry certifications or participating in ongoing apprenticeships and internships as a way to communicate the reach of CTE programs in providing students with opportunities to earn meaningful–and employable–skills and experience. Districts can note these metrics at school board meetings and schools can share them alongside other indicators of success like graduation and college acceptance rates. 
  • Connect with Graduates: Reach out to students who participated in CTE and are now settled into apprenticeships or careers to share updates and celebrations. Helping students and families to connect current CTE work to long-term success can help motivate current students. 
  • Let Students Take the Lead on Showcasing CTE Work: Invite students, especially those interested in marketing, to take the lead in researching, writing, and sharing about CTE programs. The student voice is often able to better reach current students–with a perspective more aligned to their current experiences and ideas for communication channels that will best target the intended audience.

Use this Month to Form New Partnerships and Expand Participation

Many CTE programs are strengthened by community and industry partnerships as they provide real-world applications for the CTE learning happening in schools. As educators spotlight and celebrate the success and growth of CTE programs, they can use social media posts and other forms of publicity to reach out to and invite new collaborations. Showing tangible applications to the work-based learning (WBL) partnerships provides other businesses and community partners clear ideas about what those relationships can look like and how they can benefit all involved.

And, showcasing the enthusiasm from students and actual certifications or skills gained can spark interest from younger students considering CTE programs and pathways during high school. CTE educators and administrators might include open house events or information sessions during this month to inspire others to learn more and consider how these programs might align with their CCR goals. This cycle of interest, enthusiasm, and mentoring maintains a vibrancy and energy around CTE programs that helps to sustain their purpose and success. 

The Importance of CTE for All Students

CTE programs have the potential to benefit all students–those on a college pathway, those heading to a career after high school, and those who are uncertain about what they want their postsecondary next step to be. By offering real-world learning applications, allowing students to explore different career fields, or simply getting a taste of different work environments, CTE coursework and experiences can deepen and broaden a student’s college and career readiness. Too often, however, CTE programs are not seen as relevant for all types of pathways. Schools and districts can use this month as a springboard for advertising CTE learning opportunities and experiences to all students, regardless of postsecondary goals. They can help to move conversations around CTE programming to be viewed as a central component of and a critical way to elevate a school or district’s CCR culture. 

Career and Technical Education (CTE) plays a critical role in the college and career readiness (CCR) efforts of schools and districts. CTE programs build connections between academic coursework and real-world application. They create opportunities for hands-on learning and provide some of the most meaningful elements of career exploration for secondary students. For many students, CTE courses and programs create experiences for them to try out different work styles and dynamics and build skills that they can put into use immediately after graduation. 

During the month of February, we celebrate CTE month as a reminder to highlight the incredible learning and efforts that these programs include. During this month, it is important to honor the work of CTE educators and the critical role these programs play in students’ lives and in our communities. 

Celebrate CTE Successes

Counselors and CTE educators can and should use this month to showcase CTE programming, acknowledging the unique value that these programs add for individual students, as well as the broader learning community. Use the tips below to expand awareness and help to educate others about the incredible skill development that happens in CTE programs. 

  • Use Social Media: Share social media posts about specific student experiences, highlighting the program area, participating business or organization, and the skills being developed by the student. Share pictures or quotes from students that illustrate what they are learning from their experience and note which coursework or pathway helped to prepare the student for the experience. You might also share students’ postsecondary plans and how those connect to their CTE work. 
  • Hold Demonstrations & Display Work: Invite community members and students to a CTE event where students can show off the skills they are developing as well as the tools, resources, and facilities available for them to learn and practice. Being able to see the diversity of programs and internships available–from auto mechanics to woodworking to marketing to finance to design to culinary arts–helps other students to better understand how they might be able to participate in CTE in the future.
  • Advertise Industry Certifications, Apprenticeships, and Internships: Share the number of students earning industry certifications or participating in ongoing apprenticeships and internships as a way to communicate the reach of CTE programs in providing students with opportunities to earn meaningful–and employable–skills and experience. Districts can note these metrics at school board meetings and schools can share them alongside other indicators of success like graduation and college acceptance rates. 
  • Connect with Graduates: Reach out to students who participated in CTE and are now settled into apprenticeships or careers to share updates and celebrations. Helping students and families to connect current CTE work to long-term success can help motivate current students. 
  • Let Students Take the Lead on Showcasing CTE Work: Invite students, especially those interested in marketing, to take the lead in researching, writing, and sharing about CTE programs. The student voice is often able to better reach current students–with a perspective more aligned to their current experiences and ideas for communication channels that will best target the intended audience.

Use this Month to Form New Partnerships and Expand Participation

Many CTE programs are strengthened by community and industry partnerships as they provide real-world applications for the CTE learning happening in schools. As educators spotlight and celebrate the success and growth of CTE programs, they can use social media posts and other forms of publicity to reach out to and invite new collaborations. Showing tangible applications to the work-based learning (WBL) partnerships provides other businesses and community partners clear ideas about what those relationships can look like and how they can benefit all involved.

And, showcasing the enthusiasm from students and actual certifications or skills gained can spark interest from younger students considering CTE programs and pathways during high school. CTE educators and administrators might include open house events or information sessions during this month to inspire others to learn more and consider how these programs might align with their CCR goals. This cycle of interest, enthusiasm, and mentoring maintains a vibrancy and energy around CTE programs that helps to sustain their purpose and success. 

The Importance of CTE for All Students

CTE programs have the potential to benefit all students–those on a college pathway, those heading to a career after high school, and those who are uncertain about what they want their postsecondary next step to be. By offering real-world learning applications, allowing students to explore different career fields, or simply getting a taste of different work environments, CTE coursework and experiences can deepen and broaden a student’s college and career readiness. Too often, however, CTE programs are not seen as relevant for all types of pathways. Schools and districts can use this month as a springboard for advertising CTE learning opportunities and experiences to all students, regardless of postsecondary goals. They can help to move conversations around CTE programming to be viewed as a central component of and a critical way to elevate a school or district’s CCR culture. 

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Career and Technical Education (CTE) plays a critical role in the college and career readiness (CCR) efforts of schools and districts. CTE programs build connections between academic coursework and real-world application. They create opportunities for hands-on learning and provide some of the most meaningful elements of career exploration for secondary students. For many students, CTE courses and programs create experiences for them to try out different work styles and dynamics and build skills that they can put into use immediately after graduation. 

During the month of February, we celebrate CTE month as a reminder to highlight the incredible learning and efforts that these programs include. During this month, it is important to honor the work of CTE educators and the critical role these programs play in students’ lives and in our communities. 

Celebrate CTE Successes

Counselors and CTE educators can and should use this month to showcase CTE programming, acknowledging the unique value that these programs add for individual students, as well as the broader learning community. Use the tips below to expand awareness and help to educate others about the incredible skill development that happens in CTE programs. 

  • Use Social Media: Share social media posts about specific student experiences, highlighting the program area, participating business or organization, and the skills being developed by the student. Share pictures or quotes from students that illustrate what they are learning from their experience and note which coursework or pathway helped to prepare the student for the experience. You might also share students’ postsecondary plans and how those connect to their CTE work. 
  • Hold Demonstrations & Display Work: Invite community members and students to a CTE event where students can show off the skills they are developing as well as the tools, resources, and facilities available for them to learn and practice. Being able to see the diversity of programs and internships available–from auto mechanics to woodworking to marketing to finance to design to culinary arts–helps other students to better understand how they might be able to participate in CTE in the future.
  • Advertise Industry Certifications, Apprenticeships, and Internships: Share the number of students earning industry certifications or participating in ongoing apprenticeships and internships as a way to communicate the reach of CTE programs in providing students with opportunities to earn meaningful–and employable–skills and experience. Districts can note these metrics at school board meetings and schools can share them alongside other indicators of success like graduation and college acceptance rates. 
  • Connect with Graduates: Reach out to students who participated in CTE and are now settled into apprenticeships or careers to share updates and celebrations. Helping students and families to connect current CTE work to long-term success can help motivate current students. 
  • Let Students Take the Lead on Showcasing CTE Work: Invite students, especially those interested in marketing, to take the lead in researching, writing, and sharing about CTE programs. The student voice is often able to better reach current students–with a perspective more aligned to their current experiences and ideas for communication channels that will best target the intended audience.

Use this Month to Form New Partnerships and Expand Participation

Many CTE programs are strengthened by community and industry partnerships as they provide real-world applications for the CTE learning happening in schools. As educators spotlight and celebrate the success and growth of CTE programs, they can use social media posts and other forms of publicity to reach out to and invite new collaborations. Showing tangible applications to the work-based learning (WBL) partnerships provides other businesses and community partners clear ideas about what those relationships can look like and how they can benefit all involved.

And, showcasing the enthusiasm from students and actual certifications or skills gained can spark interest from younger students considering CTE programs and pathways during high school. CTE educators and administrators might include open house events or information sessions during this month to inspire others to learn more and consider how these programs might align with their CCR goals. This cycle of interest, enthusiasm, and mentoring maintains a vibrancy and energy around CTE programs that helps to sustain their purpose and success. 

The Importance of CTE for All Students

CTE programs have the potential to benefit all students–those on a college pathway, those heading to a career after high school, and those who are uncertain about what they want their postsecondary next step to be. By offering real-world learning applications, allowing students to explore different career fields, or simply getting a taste of different work environments, CTE coursework and experiences can deepen and broaden a student’s college and career readiness. Too often, however, CTE programs are not seen as relevant for all types of pathways. Schools and districts can use this month as a springboard for advertising CTE learning opportunities and experiences to all students, regardless of postsecondary goals. They can help to move conversations around CTE programming to be viewed as a central component of and a critical way to elevate a school or district’s CCR culture. 

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Career and Technical Education (CTE) plays a critical role in the college and career readiness (CCR) efforts of schools and districts. CTE programs build connections between academic coursework and real-world application. They create opportunities for hands-on learning and provide some of the most meaningful elements of career exploration for secondary students. For many students, CTE courses and programs create experiences for them to try out different work styles and dynamics and build skills that they can put into use immediately after graduation. 

During the month of February, we celebrate CTE month as a reminder to highlight the incredible learning and efforts that these programs include. During this month, it is important to honor the work of CTE educators and the critical role these programs play in students’ lives and in our communities. 

Celebrate CTE Successes

Counselors and CTE educators can and should use this month to showcase CTE programming, acknowledging the unique value that these programs add for individual students, as well as the broader learning community. Use the tips below to expand awareness and help to educate others about the incredible skill development that happens in CTE programs. 

  • Use Social Media: Share social media posts about specific student experiences, highlighting the program area, participating business or organization, and the skills being developed by the student. Share pictures or quotes from students that illustrate what they are learning from their experience and note which coursework or pathway helped to prepare the student for the experience. You might also share students’ postsecondary plans and how those connect to their CTE work. 
  • Hold Demonstrations & Display Work: Invite community members and students to a CTE event where students can show off the skills they are developing as well as the tools, resources, and facilities available for them to learn and practice. Being able to see the diversity of programs and internships available–from auto mechanics to woodworking to marketing to finance to design to culinary arts–helps other students to better understand how they might be able to participate in CTE in the future.
  • Advertise Industry Certifications, Apprenticeships, and Internships: Share the number of students earning industry certifications or participating in ongoing apprenticeships and internships as a way to communicate the reach of CTE programs in providing students with opportunities to earn meaningful–and employable–skills and experience. Districts can note these metrics at school board meetings and schools can share them alongside other indicators of success like graduation and college acceptance rates. 
  • Connect with Graduates: Reach out to students who participated in CTE and are now settled into apprenticeships or careers to share updates and celebrations. Helping students and families to connect current CTE work to long-term success can help motivate current students. 
  • Let Students Take the Lead on Showcasing CTE Work: Invite students, especially those interested in marketing, to take the lead in researching, writing, and sharing about CTE programs. The student voice is often able to better reach current students–with a perspective more aligned to their current experiences and ideas for communication channels that will best target the intended audience.

Use this Month to Form New Partnerships and Expand Participation

Many CTE programs are strengthened by community and industry partnerships as they provide real-world applications for the CTE learning happening in schools. As educators spotlight and celebrate the success and growth of CTE programs, they can use social media posts and other forms of publicity to reach out to and invite new collaborations. Showing tangible applications to the work-based learning (WBL) partnerships provides other businesses and community partners clear ideas about what those relationships can look like and how they can benefit all involved.

And, showcasing the enthusiasm from students and actual certifications or skills gained can spark interest from younger students considering CTE programs and pathways during high school. CTE educators and administrators might include open house events or information sessions during this month to inspire others to learn more and consider how these programs might align with their CCR goals. This cycle of interest, enthusiasm, and mentoring maintains a vibrancy and energy around CTE programs that helps to sustain their purpose and success. 

The Importance of CTE for All Students

CTE programs have the potential to benefit all students–those on a college pathway, those heading to a career after high school, and those who are uncertain about what they want their postsecondary next step to be. By offering real-world learning applications, allowing students to explore different career fields, or simply getting a taste of different work environments, CTE coursework and experiences can deepen and broaden a student’s college and career readiness. Too often, however, CTE programs are not seen as relevant for all types of pathways. Schools and districts can use this month as a springboard for advertising CTE learning opportunities and experiences to all students, regardless of postsecondary goals. They can help to move conversations around CTE programming to be viewed as a central component of and a critical way to elevate a school or district’s CCR culture. 

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Career and Technical Education (CTE) plays a critical role in the college and career readiness (CCR) efforts of schools and districts. CTE programs build connections between academic coursework and real-world application. They create opportunities for hands-on learning and provide some of the most meaningful elements of career exploration for secondary students. For many students, CTE courses and programs create experiences for them to try out different work styles and dynamics and build skills that they can put into use immediately after graduation. 

During the month of February, we celebrate CTE month as a reminder to highlight the incredible learning and efforts that these programs include. During this month, it is important to honor the work of CTE educators and the critical role these programs play in students’ lives and in our communities. 

Celebrate CTE Successes

Counselors and CTE educators can and should use this month to showcase CTE programming, acknowledging the unique value that these programs add for individual students, as well as the broader learning community. Use the tips below to expand awareness and help to educate others about the incredible skill development that happens in CTE programs. 

  • Use Social Media: Share social media posts about specific student experiences, highlighting the program area, participating business or organization, and the skills being developed by the student. Share pictures or quotes from students that illustrate what they are learning from their experience and note which coursework or pathway helped to prepare the student for the experience. You might also share students’ postsecondary plans and how those connect to their CTE work. 
  • Hold Demonstrations & Display Work: Invite community members and students to a CTE event where students can show off the skills they are developing as well as the tools, resources, and facilities available for them to learn and practice. Being able to see the diversity of programs and internships available–from auto mechanics to woodworking to marketing to finance to design to culinary arts–helps other students to better understand how they might be able to participate in CTE in the future.
  • Advertise Industry Certifications, Apprenticeships, and Internships: Share the number of students earning industry certifications or participating in ongoing apprenticeships and internships as a way to communicate the reach of CTE programs in providing students with opportunities to earn meaningful–and employable–skills and experience. Districts can note these metrics at school board meetings and schools can share them alongside other indicators of success like graduation and college acceptance rates. 
  • Connect with Graduates: Reach out to students who participated in CTE and are now settled into apprenticeships or careers to share updates and celebrations. Helping students and families to connect current CTE work to long-term success can help motivate current students. 
  • Let Students Take the Lead on Showcasing CTE Work: Invite students, especially those interested in marketing, to take the lead in researching, writing, and sharing about CTE programs. The student voice is often able to better reach current students–with a perspective more aligned to their current experiences and ideas for communication channels that will best target the intended audience.

Use this Month to Form New Partnerships and Expand Participation

Many CTE programs are strengthened by community and industry partnerships as they provide real-world applications for the CTE learning happening in schools. As educators spotlight and celebrate the success and growth of CTE programs, they can use social media posts and other forms of publicity to reach out to and invite new collaborations. Showing tangible applications to the work-based learning (WBL) partnerships provides other businesses and community partners clear ideas about what those relationships can look like and how they can benefit all involved.

And, showcasing the enthusiasm from students and actual certifications or skills gained can spark interest from younger students considering CTE programs and pathways during high school. CTE educators and administrators might include open house events or information sessions during this month to inspire others to learn more and consider how these programs might align with their CCR goals. This cycle of interest, enthusiasm, and mentoring maintains a vibrancy and energy around CTE programs that helps to sustain their purpose and success. 

The Importance of CTE for All Students

CTE programs have the potential to benefit all students–those on a college pathway, those heading to a career after high school, and those who are uncertain about what they want their postsecondary next step to be. By offering real-world learning applications, allowing students to explore different career fields, or simply getting a taste of different work environments, CTE coursework and experiences can deepen and broaden a student’s college and career readiness. Too often, however, CTE programs are not seen as relevant for all types of pathways. Schools and districts can use this month as a springboard for advertising CTE learning opportunities and experiences to all students, regardless of postsecondary goals. They can help to move conversations around CTE programming to be viewed as a central component of and a critical way to elevate a school or district’s CCR culture.